buenavista

buenavista

  • Hours Of Operation
      Mon-Fri: 7:30am-6:00pm  
      Sat: 8:00am-1:00pm  
      Sun: Closed  
      Emergencies: 706-324-6659  
     

    (706) 561-1171

     

 

 

Happy New Year !!!!!!

As we say “goodbye” to 2016 and “Hello!” to 2017, we, Buena Vista Road Animal Hospital take this opportunity to wish everyone and offer our sincere “THANK YOU” for your kindness, support and faith in us.  We look forward to seeing you in the new year and continue to strive to offer our best to you and your pets.              From our family to yours ……………………………. Happy New Year !!!

 

Atopic Dermatitis Management – a new facet

Here is some good news for dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Please call (706-561-1171) or come by Buena Vista Road Animal Hospital to discuss this and see if this is a good option for your atopic pet.  

 

https://www.zoetisus.com/products/dogs/il-31/index.aspx?utm_source=AVMA_Smartbrief&utm_medium=email&utm_content=CTA_text_zoetis_develops_headline_12_22&utm_campaign=CADI_Advertorial_0816

Season’s Greetings!

From our family, to yours ………

May this Christmas bring you joy and fulfillment.

May 2017 bring you much peace.

Exam before summer fun!

It’s summer! Time for BBQs, long hikes and refreshing water play! You and your pet enjoy this time of year. It’s filled with activity, fun and food!

There are a few things we have to talk about. First, is your pet eating the right food for their lifestyle? Meeting your pet’s nutritional needs is vital to their health and happiness. So before you take your big hike with Fido or start your movie marathon on the couch with Fluffy, bring in your furry friend for their annual exam.

Second, if your pet is just 10% over their ideal body weight (that may mean 1 lb. for a 10 lb. cat), they are at risk for developing serious medical conditions. Who wants that for their buddy? No way, you say! Come in for a checkup and a pit stop at the scale!

Third, most “people” food is not good for pets, especially from the grill! For example, feeding your pet chicken bones can cause tooth fractures and tear up their digestive tract during digestion.

Make an appointment for your pet’s annual checkup today – we’ll give them a thorough physical exam from nose to tail! And we’ll talk about what they’re eating and if we have to make any changes.

Who loves your pet besides you? Us! Book your pet’s yearly exam today so we can keep your pet healthy and happy this summer!

Your Pet’s Summer Fun Safety Guide

Higher temperatures may translate into more time spent outdoors, but for pet owners, they can also mean more visits to the veterinarian.

Play It Cool

  • Walk with caution. Don’t walk your dog during the day’s highest heat and humidity, which is usually between 1 and 4 PM. This is especially important for dogs with short snouts, such as bulldogs, who can’t pant as efficiently in humid weather due to their narrowed nostrils and windpipes.
  • Never leave her in the car. Even if windows are cracked, the interior temp can rise by 19°F in as little as 7 minutes. On a hot day, this can be deadly.
  • Keep it cool indoors. Turn on the AC in your home, especially if you’ll be out of the house for several hours. If it’s too warm for you, it’s too warm for your pet.

Be Water-Wise

Use a lifejacket. Have your dog wear a life vest in a bright color in any body of water to help her stay afloat and ensure that she can be seen by swimmers and boaters. Let her get used to wearing it in your yard first.

  • Beware of currents and riptides. If a dog gets in trouble in one of these in the ocean, whether swimming or caught in a wave while fetching a ball, she can be swept out to sea in minutes. The same goes for rivers: You need to watch out for currents, even if they’re not readily visible, as your dog can be easily carried downstream.
  • Be on the lookout in lakes. If your dog steps in a sinkhole, which may cause her to panic, you need to help her swim to where she can touch ground again. Avoid lakes and ponds with blue-green algae, signified by scummy water and a foul odor. Algae can produce a toxin that may cause severe sickness or seizures quickly if your pet ingests the water, by either drinking from the lake or licking tainted fur.

Take Pool Precautions

Act life a lifeguard. Never leave your dog unsupervised near an uncovered pool.

  • Create an exit strategy. Teach her how to get out of the pool by using the stairs with her 5 to 10 times in a row. This will help her learn where the stairs are, whether she’s swimming or accidentally falls in and needs to climb out. In the deep end, consider putting in a pool ramp.

Keep Pets Bug-Free

Send parasites packing. Hookworms and heartworms are more prevalent during the summer and can gain access to your pet through the pads of his feet. Ask your vet for a prescription for flea and tick prevention and also Heartworm prevention.

Plan A Safer Cookout

Avoid using charcoal briquettes. Dogs seem to love to lap up or steal from the grill, and charcoal briquettes can easily get stuck in the stomach, causing vomiting and requiring surgery.

  • Don’t share. Barbecue scraps and fatty leftovers can give your pup pancreatitis, causing severe abdominal pain or death. Corn on the cob and peach pits are also a huge no-no because they can lodge in a dog’s intestines.
Guard Your Garden
  • Skip the azaleas. These common backyard shrubs can be toxic for dogs and cats if ingested, resulting in drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, heart arrhythmias, or an abnormal heart rate.
  • Limit the lilies. A daylily or Asiatic, Easter, or Stargazer lily and their pollen can cause acute kidney failure in cats. Ingestion of as little as two to three leaves can be fatal, so remove these plants from your yard if you let your cat out.
Check Your Garage
  • Lock up plant food. Rose and garden plant food containing insecticides can contain potentially fatal compounds. If your dog tries to eat a bag of it (or soil that’s been treated with it), he could suffer diarrhea, profuse vomiting, shock, seizures, and even death.
  • Keep away the fireworks. A threat to curious dogs that might try to eat them, fireworks are made with chemicals like potassium nitrate, and parts (like a fuse) that could get stuck in the stomach, they can cause vomiting, bloody diarrhea, seizures, and shallow breathing. Keep yours out of reach, and clear your yard of debris after you set off your display.

5/25/16

Just a friendly reminder that our clinic will be CLOSED for a staff meeting today from 12 PM – 1:30 PM. Please plan your visits accordingly and have a great day!

SCHEDULE YOUR PETS EXAM TODAY!

Orthopedic disease is painful for pets of all ages. And sometimes it’s hard to spot! Let’s take a look—book your pet’s yearly checkup today. We’ll examine them from top to bottom, inside and out to make sure your buddy is healthy and happy!

(706) 561 1171

NATIONAL PET MONTH/LIFETIME OF LOVE!

NATIONAL PET MONTH!

Lifetime of Love — The Basics: Seven days to a happier, healthier pet

Everyone loves their pets but not everyone is aware of what their pet needs from them to keep them happy and healthy long into their pet’s senior years. Leading veterinary experts in animal health, welfare, and behavior invite you to take each of the essential actions highlighted during National Pet Week® that are vital to achieving a Lifetime of Love.

Select the pet that’s right for your family’s lifestyle, and make a commitment to that pet for its life. Even if you have already welcomed a pet into your home, your veterinarian can help you better understand the social and healthcare needs of your individual pet.

Learn about how to appropriately prepare your pet to enjoy a variety of interactions with other animals, people, places and activities. Everyone will be more comfortable!

With an estimated 52.7% of dogs and 57.9% cats in the United States considered overweight or obese, and humans plagued by this issue as well, the AVMA encourages pets and their owners to get regular exercise—together! This not only improves cardiovascular health, maintains a healthy weight, and supports good mental health for both owner and pet, but it strengthens the human-animal bond.

Everybody love’s their pet, yet 53.9 percent of cat owners and 48.6 percent of dog owners do not take their pet to the veterinarian unless it is visibly sick or injured. Pets often hide signs of illness. Regular check-ups are vital to catching health problems early. Not only can early treatment mean better health for your pet, it can also save money.

Do your part to prevent pet overpopulation. Talk to your veterinarian about when you should have your pet spayed or neutered. Avoid unplanned breeding through spay/neuter, containment or managed breeding.

Include your pets in your family’s emergency plan. The AVMA offers a step-by-step guide to assembling emergency kits and plans for a variety of pets and animals.

Thanks to better care, pets are living longer now than they ever have before – but as pets get older, they need extra care and attention. Regular veterinary examinations can detect problems in older pets before they become advanced or life-threatening, and improve the chances of a longer and healthier life for your pet. Visit the AVMA’s special page for senior pets to find out what is ‘normal’ and what may signal a reason for concern about an aging pet.

HOT WEATHER TIPS

Summertime is a time for fun and frolicking but it’s also fraught with danger for our pets. When the temperature rises, we need to take extra caution to make sure our pets are okay in the heat. Here are some key tips to help keep your pet cool and safe.

Don’t leave your pet alone in the car on a warm day

Despite the warnings, every year, pets die after their owners leave them in a parked car that overheats. Dr. Ernie War did an experiment on a warm summer’s day in which he sat in a parked car with the windows cracked. He wanted to see just how hot it would get. Within 30 minutes it was 117 degrees inside the car.

Be Vigilant About Vet Care

When it starts getting warm outside, take your dog or cat to the vet for a full check up. The check up should include a heartworm test and a flea and tick protection plan. These are year-round issues but in the summer months, with much more outdoors time, it’s especially important to monitor them.

Avoid Walking Your Dog In the Heat

Aim for mornings and evenings when letting your dog outside. Glassy eyes and frantic panting indicate a dog who needs help. Get to a veterinarian immediately if you see these symptoms.

Keep Your Home Cool for your pets

When the temperature outside gets hot, it can be harder to keep the indoors cool. Some people turn their air conditioning off when they leave for the day. If you have a pet at home, this could put him in danger. Instead of turning off the air conditioner, try leaving it on a conservative but comfortable setting (perhaps 76°F) while you are out.

Give Your Pets Access to Shade and Plenty of Water

Pets can get dehydrated or get heatstroke quickly so any pet outside needs to have plenty of water and access to shade.

Know Which Dogs Are Less Tolerant of Heat

(Pugs, Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, Pekingese, Boxers, Shih Tzu’s and French Bulldogs) are less tolerant of heat.”  Also, older dogs, puppies and dogs with health issues can also be more susceptible to hot weather. Of course, you should keep a close eye on your dog in the heat, no matter what his breed, age or state of health.

Our pets rely on us to protect them and keep them comfortable and safe year round! Remember, if you’re hot, your pets are definitely hot.

Bones, Muscles and Joints

Bones, Muscles and Joints

Keep your pet moving and grooving this spring
Schedule their yearly checkup today!

Musculoskeletal diseases (conditions that involve bones, muscles and joints) can affect pets of all ages. They can have aches and pains like we do. But sometimes these diseases are hard to spot. Think about your furry friend for a moment…

Have they stopped jumping on you when they greet you at the door?

Have they stopped perching on the window sill?

Is your pet acting “old?”

These changes in activity may be due to weather, age or good training. However, to guarantee your pet is at their best, we have to rule out they don’t have a hidden musculoskeletal problem. Infections, hormonal imbalances, nutrition, blood disorders and arthritis can all affect your pet’s activity—the way they play, move, eat and cuddle!

The good news is we have ways to prevent, cure or manage these conditions, so your pet can continue to have a good quality of life. We are committed to the well-being of your pet for their lifetime. The best way to do this is to book your pet’s yearly checkup today. Make an appointment and together, we’ll keep your pet’s bones, muscles and joints (and the rest of your furry friend) in good working order!